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Consider dropping a link back to your main website in any other websites you may be running. Using one business platform to increase exposure for another is just a good idea, even if you don’t happen to be getting much traffic at those other websites. What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes. Creating content that makes an impact on a campaign can be extremely difficult. Even though Google search is not the be all and end all to business, having a site that ranks well for commonly searched for key terms helps greatly.

How will SEO help my business?

As we discovered earlier, if your search result is more compelling than those around it, searchers very well may click on it if it’s within the cluster they’re evaluating, even if it isn’t ranked highest. Using different tags and elements Get your sums right - the primary resources are all available. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or like your ABC. Its that easy! on your page will help search engines understand which parts of the content are connected to each other, and which are separate. Whenever a high authority blog links to your website, Google considers it as a positive signal toward your blog. Your blog becomes more important and it gives your site a boost in search rankings. The more backlinks you have, the higher you rank on Google Search. Placing ads in front of potential customers has traditionally been one of the easiest ways to introduce your product to the world, but things have changed a lot over the years. While traditional advertisements still have their place, companies no longer have to rely on a chance encounter to get their products in front of their customers.

Things your competitors know about 301 redirects

Listings at the top of a search engine results page (SERP) are usually a close match for the search query. In fact, Google asked these questions along with some others before releasing their highly publicized Panda update earlier this year. Strive to incorporate a small handful of links to authoritative sources throughout your copy. This communicates to your readers (and to Google’s algorithms) that your content, while unique, gives credit where it’s due. Interior links within your site will improve SEO; Sitemaps are a great way to generate internal links and make your website better too!

Remember that widgets make the web go round

Putting a Rel Author tag in all of your published posts would mean that you’re putting your reputation on the line. When I am reading articles, therefore a potential consumer, I have no idea whether a link is follow or nofollow. Clearly, a huge majority of people will not have the slightest idea that such a distinction exists! If I am intrigued by what is written about your product or service, I will click. If I really like what I see on your site, I may buy. The type of link will not be in my thoughts. You should have some level of knowledge of them and in some cases you probably will grow an expertise in these somewhat related areas. According to SEO Consultant, Gaz Hall: "So let’s say you’ve nailed down the art of quality content that solves a problem. That’s still not enough to make it to page one. You’ve got to use social to prove your content is worth a spot in Google’s sacred land. The more engagement your content gets, the more your content is performing well, which means people are likely sharing it across social — keeping you relevant and on topic. Hello, front page!"

The time you invest in splogs will pay back with improved positioning

The truth is that working on the search optimisation for your website is not a guaranteed source of traffic. Writing Take a butchers at Profile Business, for instance. headings and subheadings in Title Case has become the norm, especially in blogging, but it may not suit every blog or purpose. It’s better to rewrite unique content, then to copy and paste old and reused content. Since the very earliest days of the mass-market internet, people have spent anything from a dollar to $14 million (on sex.com) to acquire keyword-rich domain names.